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Welcome to this week’s post. If you’re reading an article called “Understanding Fence Posts,” we already know you’re our type of person. So we’re delighted you’re here.

So, fence posts. We all need them. But they tend to be one of the overlooked parts of the fence—always in the background, lending support, overshadowed by flashy pickets. But their shape, spacing, and materials are crucial decisions in your fence’s future.

Fence post spacing

How you space your fence posts depends on the materials you choose. Board fences are usually set six to eight feet apart. But barbed wire or electric fences require posts 12 to 20 feet apart. And if you’re fencing a large area with high tensile wire, you could be looking at anywhere from 15 to 90 feet apart, depending on the terrain and whether or not you’re trying to contain wily animals.

Fence post depth

General wisdom holds that you should bury a third of your fence post. For example, if you’re building a six-foot fence, the post hole needs to be two feet deep. Gate posts require an additional six inches. As for diameter, make the hole three times the post width. For example, dig a hole 12 inches wide for a four-inch diameter post.

Wood posts

Wood posts are popular but remember they will decay over time. Pressure-treated posts will last longer than wood that hasn’t been treated. If your posts have been pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate, they might survive for decades. Pine, redwood, and sweetgum are popular choices. If the ground is rocky or sandy, you’ll need to dig your wood post in deeper—maybe up to four feet.

Metal posts

Metal posts are not as ideal as they might seem at first glance. Though they’re durable and strong, they tend to bend. Wood is a more flexible choice. This is especially important if you’re fencing livestock. Once your cattle ram your metal posts a few times, well, there’s no bouncing back from that.

However, if you’re erecting a chain-link fence or something ornamental that doesn’t need to serve heavy-duty, metal posts may be fine.

Brick or stone posts

Brick or stone posts are both attractive options and give your property an upscale, custom look. But working with brick and stone is tricky—leave this to the pros if you want that fence to stay up! Hiring a professional is worth it if you dream of your fence is the envy of your Instagram followers.

Call Buzz today

Speaking of pros, let your friends at Buzz help with your fence post needs. With our many years of experience, we can quickly assess your property and tell you your top options. Give us a call today.