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driveway slide gate
If you’re shopping for a driveway gate for the first time, welcome to a new world of vocabulary. Many of our customers are surprised by the choices of slide, cantilever and swing gates. They ask, isn’t a gate just a gate?
Don’t worry. Your friends at Buzz are happy to guide you through the wonderful but sometimes confusing world of driveway gates. Following are three basic categories. These can be further subdivided, but we’ll spare you that lesson. At least, for today.

Rolling slide gate

A slide gate rolls on a wheel carrier, either from left to right or vice versa, to let your car pass through into your driveway. This means you need to have enough space to accommodate your gate on one side of your driveway, because when you open it, that gate has to go somewhere. For example, if your driveway is 16 feet wide and your 16 foot gate needs to slide to one side – plus a few feet of wiggle room – you’ll need an extra 19 feet of space on one side of your driveway. Slide gates are great for industrial businesses or grand estates. But if you live in a humbler abode, you might not have enough space for a rolling slide gate.

Cantilever slide gate

Cantilever slide gates are a more sophisticated design. These gates are up to 50 percent wider than your driveway, and hang on multiple mounting posts. This way, the gate doesn’t come in contact with the ground or with any wheels. Instead, the wheels are attached to a vertical post built on one side of the gate. Since the wheels are off the ground, cantilever slide gates are a good choice if you live somewhere with lots of ice and snow.

We Do Gates

Swing Gates

Single swing gates open just like a bedroom door, either inward or outward. Double swing gates are more like the saloon doors in old Westerns. Or like French doors, if you’re not a Western fan. They can also be installed to swing in either direction, but it’s best if your gates open inward onto your property. If your gates open outward, they’re more likely to hit a passer-by.
If your driveway slopes, you might need uphill swing gates. These can be tricky to install correctly, so make sure you choose an experienced professional.

Which gate is for you?

Still can’t figure out which is best? Call your friends at Buzz. We can talk about fences all day. In fact, we usually do!